Here I sit on the beach at Nauset Light, pondering which celebrity will leave us tomorrow.

Here I sit on the beach at Nauset Light, pondering which celebrity will leave us tomorrow.

Sometimes I fear that Bad Things tend to happen when we are on the Cape. We were here on 9/11. We were here during Beslan School Massacre in Russia. And this week we’ve witnessed some sort of strange Celebrity Death Match unfolding. Ed McMahon and Farah Fawcett were not surprises as both were in poor health. Michael Jackson was a bit of a shock. His life was such a strange tragedy, like weird art house film that I could not relate to, and his death bothered me because he never did have his big Moment of Redemption that most good stories deliver.

But Billy Mays is more than I can bear. He seemed like such a genuinely nice guy, albeit one that shouted at me from the tube to buy unlikely miracle products. He was a comfortable part of my cultural backdrop, and I was no where near ready to lose him even if I never intended to call right away to double my order for free. I didn’t trust him, but I did like him, and I’m going to miss him.

Maybe it’s the weather causing all this weird Karma. There’s an odd weather system parked offshore that is causing unusual tides here, with highs that are higher than any I’ve ever seen on the Cape. Tides in Cape Cod Bay are pretty dramatic anyway, with low tide revealing vast mud flats and tidal pools that the kids love. Our favorite place to enjoy these tides is at Rock Harbor in Orleans.

Hubby, Thing 1 and Thing 2 head out onto the mud flats at Rock Harbor.

Hubby, Thing 1 and Thing 2 head out onto the mud flats at Rock Harbor. All this is underwater at high tide.

We can walk out for at least a half mile and explore the mud flats, collecting sea shells and hunting down hermit, horseshoe, and lady crabs. The kids like to try to catch the little mummichogs stuck in the tidal pools, though those tiny fish are really hard to nab. Rock Harbor treated us with a nice collection of shells again this year, including two types of scallops, clams, and moon snails.

The greenish snail shell here is occupied by a hermit crab, who was not harmed while making this photo.

The greenish snail shell here is occupied by a hermit crab, who was not harmed while making this photo.

Thing 2 ran around like a wild man, getting completely soaked even though he was wearing regular clothing, not a swim suit. If you can’t get away with that on the Cape though, then what’s the point of being a 6 year old boy?

Thing 2, aka Superman, runs through the knee deep water.

Thing 2, aka Superman, runs through the knee deep water.

Today the weather was foggy and dank, so we headed up to Provincetown to poke through the shops. This was a mistake. Today was the Portuguese Festival and Blessing of the Fleet, which is a pretty impressive event, and also the Cape Cod Getaway MS Bike Ride, which is the largest MS ride in Massachusetts. The crowds were more than we enjoy dealing with, so we left pretty quickly.

For the afternoon we decided to poke through the Gristmill Antiques Gallery in Eastham. Hubby loves the big metal fish sculpture on their front lawn, though $10,000 is a little pricey for a souvenir. I love poking around the place to treasures. I wouldn’t call myself an antique hunter, but I sure do like finding old and used things that I can give a new home to. Today we bought a glass citrus juicer and some assorted flatware for the kids’ lunch boxes. My kids will dine next year with silver that cost me only $1 a piece! I find this particular gallery very acocmodating to kids, and they make us feel perfectly comfortable there with our two Things despite having so many lovely and pricey fragile items on display. I think I found something there to get Hubby for his upcoming birthday as well (and it’s not the huge fish)!

Thing 1 would like our fisherman neighbor to know that she caught a metal fish much larger than the 30 pound striped bass he caught last month.

Thing 1 would like our fisherman neighbor to know that she caught a metal fish much larger than the 30 pound striped bass he caught last month.

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